Three hundred and thirty

330

Postcard Back Composition #8, Random

2012 by Daniel Eatock
From The Artists’ Postcard Show 2012

Eatcock has done something very clever with his Postcard Back Composition, taking the lines and square of the back of a postcard – a design we know so well – and shaking them up, immediately giving this well loved layout a personality. Seeing anything we are familiar with ‘turned on its head’ is pleasing; the notion is playful, giving us the idea that we need not take our reality quite so seriously. Art gives the platform to manipulate what we know so well, and thus we have the appeal of the wonderful surrealists (see postcard 120). Eatock’s composition is doubly inviting; we are drawn in by these lines which are suddenly given a voice of their own, usually standing only as a guide to our own written ramblings. Breaking free in their blank space, it is their turn to take back the paper they usually so rigidly define. Gliding through the space, crossing over on another, the stamp guide mischievously angled, the composition is fuelled with gleeful energy as these lines dance joyfully in their new found vitality. The pure white background – Eatock keeps the crisp monochrome – reminds us what the space is usually used for, and further intrigues by hinting at its possibilities. Indeed, what fun it would be to use this back of a postcard for writing – scribing in angles across the lines, the address perhaps darting across the bottom, the stamp bouncing off to the left hand side. I wonder whether Frederick Hartmann – the inventor of the ‘divided back’ in 1902 – would be amused.

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Filed under Postcards, Twenty First-Century

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