Two hundred and forty

Untitled

2010 by Heringa/Van Kalsbeek
Vegas Gallery, to be shown at London Art Fair, Stand 2

Heringa/Van Kalsbeek, the Netherlands’ art duo, were part of Vegas’s group exhibition GIVEITANAME in April of this year. They provided a three dimensional exploration into colour, reactive against the paintings of Eemyun Kang and Gemma Nelson, and are due to appear with Vegas once again in the London Art Fair in January. Heringa/Van Kalsbeek themselves describe their work as three dimensional painting; building on an initial object, their sculpture grows in layers – colour and shape on top of one another, feelers reaching for a design. This experimental growth reads very much like a painting, with one’s eye powerless to stop following the delicate and exploratory sculptural lines that carry viewing; it is almost impossible to view these sculptures as a whole, so intricate and lively is the design. This delicacy also provides a haunting vitality, with form appearing like blown glass, reaching and swelling at points to form elegant gesticulations. The sculptures are in fact made of resin, coloured and embellished with paint that clings to the encased initial inspiration – often rope, plants or synthetic material. It is little wonder that many of these sculptures spring from nature, as there is something distinctly organic in the way they form – skeletal, with the back bone they seem to spring from, or deeply internal as deep purples appear as pulled strings of a fleshy heart. They are like frozen life forms, a creature or awesome insect captured perfectly still, mid-air. Here, soft white feathers bristle gently like wings, contrasting to the pointed weapon-like arrows that surge from the front. These sculptures are beautiful, fantastical and slightly frightening, their shining skin gleaming in a tumult and exclamation of colour.

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1 Comment

Filed under Twenty First-Century

One response to “Two hundred and forty

  1. Pingback: Wish you were still here, Vyner Street | Art on a postcard

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